Studying in the US: 9 things to consider when applying to an American university

Studying in the US: 9 things to consider when applying to an American university

- in Education

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The number of UK students enrolled in US universities increased by 20 per cent between 2011 and 2015, and the trend is likely to continue. Places are more in demand because of increased fees in the UK and concern for value for money, as students are unable or unwilling to commit to one subject for their university experience. As well as this, there seems to be a greater awareness of international opportunities, so if you’re considering the US this A-level results day, here are the nine things you need to know:

1. Studying in the US isn’t as expensive as you may think

The higher education system in the US is different to the UK. In the US, you have one-to-one mandatory professor office hours and, on average, every student spends 15 hours in class as well as their individual sessions. So, essentially, you get more for your money in America, especially given the fee increase in the UK.

Everything is included in the ‘sticker price’ in the US – accommodation, subsistence, books, and medical insurance – and you may also find the university of your choice offers funds for international students, possibly based on academic merit, but possibly also based on need, athletic ability, or talent for music and drama.

2. Research and get ahead of the competition

College Board is your best source of free and unbiased information to do your research. You can narrow your search criteria by size, location, and difficulty of admission. Also, find out if you need to take SAT/ACT exams – definitely worth looking into even before you begin the application. It’s better to spend your time and money in preparation and not for re-testing.

Furthermore, let your school know you’re applying to US universities – the documents they need to prepare take much longer than Ucas applications, so the earlier you can do this, the better.

[Source:- independent]