Sturgeon launches school reading challenge

Sturgeon launches school reading challenge

- in Education

Nicola Sturgeon and school pupils

Nicola Sturgeon has challenged pupils across Scotland to read from a list of 100 books as part of a drive to improve literacy.

The First Minister’s Reading Challenge is designed to encourage children to read for pleasure and develop a life-long love of books.

The initiative is supported by the Scottish Book Trust, which will roll it out for primary four to seven pupils.

Reading standards among P4, P7 and S2 pupils have fallen in recent years.

The reading challenge aims to build on the work already taking place in schools to encourage children to read widely, explore a range of books and develop a love of reading.

The Scottish government said its list of 100 books had been selected by a panel of academics, experts and teachers.

Write reviews

It includes Ms Sturgeon’s favourite childhood book – Five On A Treasure Island – from Enid Blyton’s Famous Five series.

Children will be able to log their reading progress, with a range of prizes awarded in June next year, and will be encouraged to write reviews of the books they read.

There will also be the opportunity for every child’s personal achievements to be recognised by their teachers and librarians.

The challenge was launched by Ms Sturgeon alongside pupils from South Morningside Primary School at the Edinburgh International Book Festival.

She said: “Encouraging children to read for pleasure not only helps our young people develop vital language and literacy skills, but also opens up a whole new world of adventure and fun through the exciting and varied range of books suggested.

“Some of my happiest childhood memories involve immersing myself in stories so I’m pleased to have the opportunity to encourage young people to also experience the joy of reading for pleasure.”

The first minister was joined by author Alice Melvin, who said helping children to discover the joy of reading was “one of the best gifts you can give them”.

She added: “Reading allows children to explore their emotions, expand their horizons, develop their empathy and, above all, to lose themselves in the drama of a great story.”

[Source:- BBC]