Update your Google Chrome NOW – tech giant warns over dangerous bug ‘that lets hackers hijack your computer’

GOOGLE is warning Chrome users to update their browsers immediately due to a security bug that could let hackers hijack your computer.

The tech firm was forced to make an announcement because hackers managed to uncover the bug before Google found it – which is a major cause for concern.

<img class="lazyautosizes lazyloaded" src="data:;base64,” sizes=”620px” srcset=”https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474286865.jpg?w=960 180w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474286865.jpg?w=960 360w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474286865.jpg?w=960 540w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474286865.jpg?w=960 720w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474286865.jpg?w=960 900w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474286865.jpg?w=960 1080w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474286865.jpg?w=960 1296w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474286865.jpg?w=960 1512w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474286865.jpg?w=960 1728w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474286865.jpg?w=960 1944w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474286865.jpg?w=960 2160w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474286865.jpg?w=960 2376w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474286865.jpg?w=960 2592w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474286865.jpg?w=960 2808w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474286865.jpg?w=960 3024w” alt=” Chrome users should update their browsers immediately” data-credit=”Alamy” data-sizes=”auto” data-img=”https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474286865.jpg?strip=all&w=960″ data-srcset=”https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474286865.jpg?w=960 180w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474286865.jpg?w=960 360w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474286865.jpg?w=960 540w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474286865.jpg?w=960 720w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474286865.jpg?w=960 900w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474286865.jpg?w=960 1080w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474286865.jpg?w=960 1296w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474286865.jpg?w=960 1512w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474286865.jpg?w=960 1728w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474286865.jpg?w=960 1944w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474286865.jpg?w=960 2160w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474286865.jpg?w=960 2376w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474286865.jpg?w=960 2592w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474286865.jpg?w=960 2808w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474286865.jpg?w=960 3024w” />

ALAMY
2
Chrome users should update their browsers immediately

Google regularly fixes bugs that can exploit your computer software and reduce computer security.

But sometimes, these bugs are known as ‘zero-day’ – that’s when cyber-crooks work out how to exploit the glitch before Google itself.

It means the firm had zero days to prepare to tackle the problem because they didn’t know it could happen.

That’s the case with this latest bug, which means hackers have had a head-start – and that’s bad news for you.

<img class="lazyautosizes lazyloaded" src="data:;base64,” sizes=”620px” srcset=”https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474287060.jpg?w=960 180w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474287060.jpg?w=960 360w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474287060.jpg?w=960 540w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474287060.jpg?w=960 720w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474287060.jpg?w=960 900w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474287060.jpg?w=960 1080w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474287060.jpg?w=960 1296w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474287060.jpg?w=960 1512w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474287060.jpg?w=960 1728w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474287060.jpg?w=960 1944w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474287060.jpg?w=960 2160w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474287060.jpg?w=960 2376w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474287060.jpg?w=960 2592w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474287060.jpg?w=960 2808w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474287060.jpg?w=960 3024w” alt=” Cyber-criminals could exploit the vulnerability to remotely take over computers” data-credit=”Alamy” data-sizes=”auto” data-img=”https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474287060.jpg?strip=all&w=960″ data-srcset=”https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474287060.jpg?w=960 180w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474287060.jpg?w=960 360w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474287060.jpg?w=960 540w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474287060.jpg?w=960 720w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474287060.jpg?w=960 900w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474287060.jpg?w=960 1080w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474287060.jpg?w=960 1296w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474287060.jpg?w=960 1512w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474287060.jpg?w=960 1728w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474287060.jpg?w=960 1944w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474287060.jpg?w=960 2160w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474287060.jpg?w=960 2376w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474287060.jpg?w=960 2592w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474287060.jpg?w=960 2808w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NINTCHDBPICT000474287060.jpg?w=960 3024w” />

ALAMY
2
Cyber-criminals could exploit the vulnerability to remotely take over computers

Chrome users don’t need to panic though as they can simply update their browser to protect themselves.

Detailed information about what will happen if users don’t update their software has not yet been revealed.

Google said: “Access to bug details and links may be kept restricted until a majority of users are updated with a fix.

“We will also retain restrictions if the bug exists in a third party library that other projects similarly depend on, but haven’t yet fixed.”

However, some tech experts are theorising that the security vulnerability could allow hackers to implant malware without any warnings or popups, read files and potentially even take over computers remotely.

Chrome security researcher Justin Schuh wrote on Twitter: “Also, seriously, update your Chrome installs… like right this minute.”

[“source=thesun”]

Ocean State Update: The Biggest Rhode Island Tech & Startup News From January

At the end of every month, we recap the biggest tech and startup happenings in Rhode Island. We have an archive of past roundups here. To get this info weekly (Tuesday afternoons, to be exact), sign up for the Rhode Island Inno Beat newsletter.

Let’s take a look.


  1. The Providence Journal reported that Gov. Gina Raimondo’s latest budget includes a new $1.3 million tax credit for “early stage” companies or those “substantially increasing its investment in research and development.” The tax credits would be worth 22.5 percent of the cost of that new research up to $250,000 per company. Current law provides a 5 percent credit for research costs, but many technology startups generate little in the way of profits or tax liability and don’t benefit. By being able to sell the credits to more mature companies, the Raimondo administration hopes to make it much more valuable for early-stage ventures.
  2. Inspire Environmental, a Middletown firm specializing in environmental assessments and seafloor mapping, will relocate to the new Innovate Newport business incubator expected to open this winter, Providence Business News reported. The firm will be the largest tenant at the Innovate Newport incubator, occupying about 4,350 square feet on the building’s second floor. The $7 million-plus construction project involves converting the former Sheffield School on Broadway into an office space and amenities for small companies, startups and entrepreneurs. The project is spearheaded by the City of Newport and the Newport County Chamber of Commerce, which also is relocating to the incubator site. Towerhill Associates will be another tenant.
  3. Gov. Raimondo and University of Rhode Island President David Dooley debuted three Rhode Island Innovation campuses, which together represent the initiative’s first round of projects. The trio of campuses includes the University of Rhode Island and Arizona State University Innovation Hub, the Rhode Island “iHub” and Rhode Island Agricultural Innovation & Entrepreneurship Campus. The private investment in the URI-affiliated projects is expected to top $122 million, a figure that is 10 times the state’s investment.
  4. CVS Health will spend $100 million over the next five years to support community health programs following its roughly $70 billion acquisition of health insurer Aetna, according to CNBC. The initiative, dubbed “Building Healthier Communities,” seeks to improve access to affordable health care, manage health challenges like chronic conditions and opioids and partner with communities. The bulk of the funding will come from the CVS Health Foundation and Aetna Foundation, with the rest coming from the company.
  5. The entity formerly known as MedMates has rebranded. Now known as Rhode Island Bio, the 2011-born group still works to coalesce the life science industry throughout southeastern New England.`Additionally, Rhode Island Bio has become the official affiliate of Biotechnology Innovation Organization, and will “work to secure resources for the Rhode Island life sciences community and provide its members with exclusive access to events, materials and supplies, workspaces, growth partners and more.”
  6. Our deep dive showed how Ocean State Job Lot, one of Rhode Island’s largest employers has survived for more than 40 years using one consistent business model: Finding the best deals on merchandise and then passing the savings to the customer. Also of note, the national retailer has developed a new website and is even considering ecommerce.
  7. Blue tech champion SeaAhead announced it will be establishing a hub at the Cambridge Innovation Center next month. SeaAhead catalyzes the intersection of oceans, innovation and sustainability.” The entity’s influence covers southern New England, 75 miles around its headquarters in Providence.
  8. Four Rhode Island companies represented the Ocean State this month at the Consumer Electric Show in Las Vegas hosted by the Consumer Technology Association. The event showcases more than 4,500 companies displaying over 4.5 million net square feet across the city. These organizations exhibited their newest tech, hardware and other products to more than 180,000 attendees from 150 countries. The event also boasts over 250 sessions of programming.
  9. Seventeen Rhode Island-based food businesses began the Social Enterprise Greenhouse Food Accelerator program earlier this month. The accelerator, SEG’s signature venture development program, includes a 12-week blended learning model that provides high impact social entrepreneurs the tools, networks and resources to validate their idea, understand their customer and formalize growth strategies from fundraising to social impact measurement.
  10. This March, Rhode Island Inno is bringing the tech and startup communities together for some healthy competition — bracket-style. Submit your nomination here or complete the form below. Tech Madness is our annual bracket challenge designed to generate awareness and excitement for the city’s ecosystem, and those that are driving it forward. Rhode Island Inno will assemble a bracket of private, fast-growing, tech-enabled local businesses and seed them based on funding. Then, we’ll ask the community to vote on each matchup in every round. Companies go head-to-head, with Rhode Island Inno’s readers determining who moves on by answering just one question: “Who would you invest in?”

 

[“source=americaninno”]

Week In Tech: Google I/O 2019, Amazon Scout, Google Maps Car Accidents Update And More

This week in Tech witnessed quite a few important updates. Google’s  I/O developer conference is going to be held between May 7-9. What’s more, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg may be planning to merge WhatsApp, Instagram and Facebook Messenger. So here’s a quick roundup of all the important stories we covered between January 21-27, 2019.

Google I/O 2019 developer conference scheduled for May 7-9

Google I/O 2019 developer conference is scheduled for May 7-9. Google is expected to make some key announcements around Android, Google Assistant, Search and Maps, in addition to engaging with developers from around the world to discuss the future of AI, machine learning and more. Folks over at Google are likely to introduce Android Q.

Zuckerberg reportedly plans to merge WhatsApp, Instagram and Facebook Messenger

According to the New York Times, Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg is planning to merge WhatsApp, Instagram and Facebook Messenger. Given that WhatsApp supports end-to-end encryption, Facebook will have to integrate make Instagram Direct and Messenger services compatible with end-to-end encryption protocol.

Amazon Scout, a new fully-electric autonomous delivery system

E-commerce giant Amazon has started testing a new, fully-electric autonomous delivery system called Amazon Scout. Initially, will deliver packages to customers in a neighbourhood in Snohomish County, Washington. However, these vehicles will initially be accompanied by Amazon employees.

Samsung unveils world’s first 4K OLED display for laptops

We all know that Samsung supplies their OLED display panels to Apple. Now, Samsung is building the world’s first 4K OLED display for laptops. We are expecting brands such as Dell and Lenovo to opt for these 4K OLED panels for laptops for their XPS and Yoga series respectively. Samsung’s first UHD OLED laptop display panel will enter mass-production next month.

Facebook Moments to shut down next month

Facebook has decided to put an end to their “Moments” app from February 25 citing lack of users as the reason. Facebook Moments is a standalone app designed to let users privately share photos and videos. Facebook hasn’t shared the exact number of users using the app. But Facebook is shutting it down because not a lot of people are using it.

Google Maps can now show car accidents too

Google Maps is testing a new feature that shows users if there’s been an accident on the way to their destination. We were able to spot this feature in Google Maps for Android beta version 10.7.2. So Google would soon expand its reach to more users, presumably on both Android and iOS.

[“source=republicworld”]

Profit, Peril And The Internet Of Things

Gartner: 20.4 billion connected devices are expected to be in use by 2020.Andres Urena

Private equity firms searching for the next big thing are looking with excitement to the Internet of Things (IoT) and the Gartner forecast that 20.4 billion connected devices will be in use by 2020. IoT growth rates are astounding, but the risks and rewards for investors will come from how industry players deal with new security threats.

The proliferation of IoT devices means more equipment is vulnerable to a security breach than ever before. That’s everything from virtual voice assistants and washing machines in your home, to manufacturing robots and physical access controls (keys, fobs and motion detectors) at your workplace.

Many experts say the answer is to integrate physical and cyber security systems. “By managing security holistically, companies improve coordinated response and recovery,” said G. Mark Hardy, president of National Security Corporation, in an email response about the issue.

Despite these benefits, companies are coming up short. The experts I spoke with see little progress and misdirected resources, both in terms of business planning and consumer protections. Most organizations are reactive when it comes to cyber risk. At the same time, consumer product companies are skimping on security to reduce costs and enhance profits, while diverting everyone’s attention to convenience. It’s the kind of poor leadership that creates extraordinary risks for investors and others.

“Out of Business in Six Months”

“Because they secure sensitive, personal identifiable information, a company is a fiduciary of that information. That means they have a fiduciary responsibility to safeguard that information,” said Darren Guccione, CEO and co-founder of password manager Keeper Security, in an email. “Failure to do so, especially for a small to medium sized business can be catastrophic.”

Mr. Guccione says nearly 60% of all small businesses that experience a pervasive data breach are out of business in six months and that larger companies often experience brand damage, loss of customers and litigation costs.

An eerie example of consumer IoT issues occurred this year when Walmart, Amazon and eBay reportedly stopped carrying connected teddy bears from toy manufacturer CloudPets after two million recorded messages from parents and children were exposed to potential hackers.

Mr. Hardy, a high profile speaker and instructor on cyber security, explains that cost is the underlying issue: “As most devices use IP (internet protocol) for communications, it is unlikely that a proprietary standard will emerge. That suggests a ‘race to the bottom’ in manufacturing and marketing costs for most IoT technology in the absence of enforceable patents.”

Robert M. Lee, CEO and founder of Dragos, Inc., an industrial cyber security company, puts it plainly: “Many IoT vendors have completely sacrificed security to lower cost. Instead of building security in as we already know how to do, IoT vendors are compromising on it.”

An ‘Always Present,’ ‘Always On’ Mentality

While cost is the issue, a lack of corporate leadership and oversight is exacerbating the problem. Too many boards and their top management teams are delegating security to IT and other experts without sufficient oversight.

A 2017 survey of 600 organizations with more than 500 employees by IDC showed that 75% of firms didn’t have a managed incident response plan, even though more than half of organizations experienced 10 or more security incidents or alerts each week. The same survey found that only 35% of firms have an incident-response process that includes reporting any security breach to their board. In early December, the National Association of Corporate Directors (NACD) released a survey of 500 public company directors, with only 52% saying they understand cyber risks sufficiently to provide effective oversight.

The statistics are alarming because the impetus to join physical and cyber security has been around a long time. In healthcare, it dates back to 2005 and a security rule for the Healthcare Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) requiring physical, technical and administrative safeguards, according to Dave Newell, a former U.S. Air Force officer with the Pentagon’s 7th Communications Group and founder of Loptr, an information security company. For credit card merchants, Mr. Newell notes that the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) defined physical security expectations for cardholder data as early as 2004.

“Even though the regulations had this direction, organizations generally had some person, maybe an ex-cop, who was responsible for physical security and another, in IT, responsible for the technological security,” Mr. Newell says. “A lot of organizations just didn’t connect the two.”

“We need to have an ‘always present,’ ‘always on’ mentality, but people don’t think about it until they encounter an event,” says Ted Schneider, chief technology officer of ARCOS LLC, a provider of resource management solutions for utilities, manufacturers and airlines.

In an IoT world, Mr. Schneider foresees the threat of someone putting together disparate data in a system that isn’t integrated, for example HR, payroll and financial systems. “On its own, it could be harmless,” he says. “But in such a scenario, compounded clean data suddenly becomes a cyber threat.”

A Contrarian View

Mr. Lee disagrees with the emphasis on combining physical and cyber security and says the real issue is companies confusing enterprise IT with industrial security and misdirecting their resources. While he believes companies should combine physical and cyber security data, they are separate threat models.

“There needs to be an awakening that almost every company is an industrial company,” he says, noting that organizations without three- to five-year board level industrial security strategies, risk everything from safety to intellectual property. “As we connect more and more with IoT, we’re opening up risks.”

Mr. Lee, a former cyber warfare operations officer with the U.S. Air Force (tasked to the NSA), points to the 2015/2016 cyber attacks in the Ukraine that shut down electric power for the first time in history as an example of industrial security planning. “Figure out the way those cyber attacks occurred to identify methods for preventing it from occurring with other facilities,” he says.

[“source-forbes”]

Amazfit Pace Review

Amazfit Pace Review

The Amazfit Pace is a fitness oriented watch designed for runners. Amazfit is a brand owned by Huami, a company backed by the well-known tech brand Xiaomi. We reviewed the Amazfit Stratos a little while ago, which was a watch targeted specifically at triathletes, but had a number of problems. The Amazfit Pace is less expensive and lacks some of the features of the Stratos. This new model doesn’t support swim tracking, and it’s only IP67 rated for water and dust resistance. That means it’ll be fine if immersed up to 1m deep in water for a short time, which is not good enough for swimmers.

We like the design of the Amazfit Pace a lot more than we liked the Stratos. This watch is thinner, lighter, and looks a lot better thanks to the ceramic ring that surrounds its display. This fitness watch has only one button, with the rest of the interface relying on its touchscreen. The button doesn’t do much apart from unlocking the device and powering it on or off. The Amazfit Pace’s strap is made of a soft rubber-like material, similar to the one on the Stratos. This material is pretty comfortable to wear, but it left temporary marks on our skin because we like wearing watches tight.

The base of the Amazfit Pace has a heart rate sensor and contacts for charging. The Pace uses a proprietary charger which is different from the one used on the Amazfit Stratos. This fragmentation is something we’ve seen with Fitbit as well, and it’s sad that you can’t reuse chargers. Ideally, we’d want companies to be using one charger for all products, but that rarely happens in the wearables space. On the other hand, the custom charging plate has a Micro-USB port, so at least you can use common USB cables and wall adapters.

amazfit pace back charger gadgets 360 Amazfit Pace

Amazfit Pace has a clip-on charger

The Amazfit Pace has a colour display, but that’s also the biggest weakness of this device. The backlight is just not bright enough to always be legible outdoors under harsh sunlight. Viewing angles are pretty bad too, which means that the display is best read by looking at it directly. If you view it at an angle, as is common for something you wear on your wrist, it’s not always going to be readable. We’re quite disappointed with this display, and we think that at this price point, there are other fitness watches that are easier to glance at, such as TomTom Spark 3. It would have been better to have a monochrome display that was easier to read.

The Amazfit Pace’s software is pretty much the same as that on the Stratos. It’s a proprietary OS designed by Huami, and we’re not big fans of the interface. There’s a very limited number of watch faces, which is a big disappointment. There are hardly any apps for the Amazfit Pace so basic features such as recording your workout data via a third-party app such as Strava or Nike+ Running isn’t straightforward.

The only app we found interesting was the Training Center app, which allows you to follow a plan and train for races. A lot of people only use wearables to track their runs and workouts, but if you have a proper training plan and want your watch to train you, this app does the job.

The smartwatch features of the Amazfit Pace are also quite limited. You can see notifications but not respond to them. This means that this wearable is much more of a fitness watch for runners, and notifications are a less important built-in feature.

The Amazfit Watch smartphone app looks slick, but it doesn’t do much. Most of the things you need to customise (such as 12- or 24-hour time display) can be done directly on the watch, and the only use for the app for us was to see check our run durations and heart rate stats. This brings us to the performance of the Amazfit Pace.

We used this watch for multiple runs, and two of these need to be brought to your attention. One was a 10km race at Mumbai’s Bandra-Kurla Complex area, which has wide roads by Mumbai standards and a lot of tall office buildings. We ran this race on a certified course, which means that it was measured and built to exacting standards. The Amazfit Pace, at the end of the run, said we’d run 10.07km. This is extremely accurate, and we saw similar results when running in open areas.

amazfit pace side charger gadgets 360 Amazfit Pace

Amazfit Pace’s charger uses a Micro-USB port

However, the second run was on a 1km route near our office. This stretch has a flyover and lots of trees, and only the best GPS devices are able to track runs through this area properly. We used a car’s odometer to verify that the distance was 1km. At the end of the run, the Amazfit Pace showed that we’d run 1.24km. A 24 percent error in measurement is unacceptable. The best GPS-based run trackers will work reasonably well even when the conditions aren’t ideal, and unfortunately the Amazfit Pace is not one of them.

We also tested the step tracker on the Amazfit Pace with our standard 1,000-step test. Here we walk 1,000 steps while counting manually, and then check how the watch’s data compares. The Amazfit Pace showed that we’d walked 1,004 steps at the end of this test and that’s about as accurate as it gets.

The heart rate sensor on the Amazfit Pace was fairly accurate most of the time. We tested this by wearing the Amazfit Pace on our right hand and an Apple Watch Series 2 on our left. We also verified our data once using a finger pulse oximeter, which is used widely to check heart rate. When running, the Amazfit Pace was able to take pretty accurate measurements.

However, the watch does not have a dedicated strength training or gym mode for heart rate measurement. The best it does is “Indoor Walk / Run”, “Elliptical” or “Bike Indoors”. We used the last two for our strength training sessions thrice a week during the review period. It’s here that the Amazfit Pace failed completely. In those two modes, the heart rate displayed on the watch was much lower than our actual heart rate. In one session, we did 20 box jumps really quickly. Both the Apple Watch and the oximeter showed our heart rate as 183bpm, but the Amazfit Pace measured between 112bpm and 125bpm. Strength training is a big part of any runner’s life, and it’s sad to see that the Amazfit Pace isn’t equipped to track these sessions.

amazfit pace button gadgets 360 Amazfit Pace

Amazfit Pace has a single hardware button on the side

The battery life of the Amazfit Pace was good. We managed to make the watch last around four days on a single charge. This included two indoor gym sessions and one run, with continuous heart rate monitoring enabled throughout, and also with our phone’s notifications enabled. We’d have been happier if the watch had been able to last through a full working week, but it’s only a minor inconvenience.

The Amazon-exclusive Amazfit Pace is priced at Rs. 9,999, but there is a catch. A couple of times that we checked, this watch was out of stock and only available from third-party sellers on Amazon, who were charging around Rs. 12,990 for it. The watch did come back in stock later but third-party sellers selling the device at higher prices is a concern. At its official price, the Amazfit Pace offers decent value, if you can live without a proper gym mode and GPS functionality that doesn’t work perfectly when conditions aren’t ideal. We think that products such as the TomTom Spark are better, but they cost a little more too.

[“source-ndtv”]

OnePlus 5 and OnePlus 5T are now receiving Android 9 Pie

OnePlus has over the past few weeks released two beta builds of the Android 9 Pie update for the OnePlus 5 and 5T, and now the stable version is rolling out.

The finalized version of the update is headed to the company’s two handsets from last year. It arrives as OxygenOS 9.0.0, based on Android Pie. It contains the December 2018 security patches too.

When you get the new software, you’ll see the brand new Pie UI, new navigation gestures for the 5T, and you get a new Do Not Disturb mode too, with adjustable settings. Google Lens is integrated in the Camera app, and Gaming mode 3.0 comes with a text notification mode and added notifications for third party calls.

Obviously some unnamed system improvements are baked in as well. As usual, the rollout is staged. It’s going out to a small percentage of users at the moment, and it will expand in a few days.

[“source-ndtv”]

A Warning For Anyone Buying A Nintendo Switch This Christmas

Mario Kart 8.Credit: Nintendo

If you’re looking to buy a Nintendo Switch for a loved one this Christmas, I applaud your decision. In less than two years the Switch has become a well-rounded system stacked with some of the best exclusives in the industry as well as a giant library of third-party and indie games that more than fill in the gaps between major Nintendo releases. On top of that, it retains all of the charms it had at launch: the focus on local multiplayer, the magic of playing on the go, the ability to play Mario Kart at bars, etc. I take it on flights and play with whoever is sitting next to me: I haven’t had anyone say no yet.

That doesn’t mean there aren’t some caveats here, however. First off, something I talked about around Black Friday: the Switch is an accessory-hungry device, and you can expect to spend a lot more than just the initial asking price on hardware alone. At the very least you’re probably going to want to upgrade the anemic onboard memory, and that doesn’t come free. Other things, like extra Joy-Cons for four-player multiplayer or a pro controller, could get this thing up to cost of an Xbox One X in a hurry. More importantly, however, is something a bit more Christmas-specific: you are going to want to open this thing before Christmas morning and get it set up.

While the Nintendo Switch, as a machine designed to played on subways and airplanes, is not quite so reliant on internet connectivity as the Xbox One or PS4, it’s still a fairly major part of the experience. Christmas morning, however, can be pretty dicey when it comes to online gaming. It’s a moment where there are literally millions of people opening up boxes and setting consoles within the span of a few hours, slamming systems that aren’t designed for anywhere near that level of traffic and frequently causing problems. It’s a problem even more much-more established services like Xbox Live, PlayStation Network and Steam. Nintendo, by contrast, has never been all that great at the online experience.

I’m not saying that Nintendo’s eShop and other online services will definitely go down on Christmas, but you might as well prepare for that eventuality.

So when you get the Switch you’re planning on giving to someone else, start by opening it up. Connect it to your wi-fi and update all the software it asks you too: there will likely be one larger system-level update as well as an update for the controllers. Then, set up a Nintendo account: account creation is one of those services most likely to go down on Christmas–no system is designed for that many new accounts at once. If you’re planning on signing up for Nintendo Online, do that too.

If your gifts involve physical games, you might still want to install and update them ahead of time. If your gifts involve digital games, definitely go ahead and download those ahead of time. Again, it’s not that I’m saying any of these systems will definitely go down on Christmas day. It’s that they might, and you’ll look quite crafty if you’ve managed to get out ahead of things.

 

[“source=forbes]

Qualcomm aims to ban iPhone XS and iPhone XR in China too

On Monday the Fuzhou Intermediate People’s Court in China banned the import and sale of select iPhones due to a lawsuit between Qualcomm and Apple. Cupertino had to pull out phones from iPhone 6s all the way to iPhone X but said the 2018 devices are not affected by this ruling.

Apparently, the chipset company thinks otherwise and now filed for an injunction of the iPhone XS, iPhone XS Max and iPhone XR in China as the next step in its legal battle with Apple.

The action is another move in the legal battle between the tech giants that are still nowhere near reaching a deal about licensing fees and patent application. Interestingly enough, a US company banning another US company on the foreign ground will boost the domestic competitors even more.

Apple warned that the ban would hurt Chinese manufacturers like Foxconn and noted that it had created 5 million jobs across the country’s supply chain. Apple representative was quoted to say that the company “will be forced to settle with the Respondent, causing all mobile phone manufacturers to relapse into the previous unreasonable charging mode and pay high licensing fees.”

[“source=indiatoday]

Tech faculty have to update teaching skills

AICTE_colleges

Come 2019 and the way students are trained in technical education institutions could change significantly as teachers in these institutions will have to come armed with updated teaching skills.
The All-India Council for Technical Education, that regulates technical education, is ready with a six-month faculty training programme that teachers in engineering and management institutions will have to undertake in order to join these institutes as faculties.

Officials in the AICTE, under the Union Ministry of Human Resources Development, said that the training programme has been developed keeping in mind the changing demands of the industry and the way faculty should adapt to those challenges.

“This programme is mandatory for institutions approved by the council,” a senior council official said. “Improving the faculty quality is one of the ways through which the government is trying to improve technical education, especially engineering education in the country.”

Sources said the training module has been developed by top faculties in Indian Institutes of Technology and other premier institutions.

New teachers will have to take the mandatory training to get a job and those who are already teaching will get training in order to get a promotion.

The AICTE aims to train and upgrade around five lakh faculty members in different technical colleges across the country through this programme in the next two to three years.

“It will be mandatory for all those who want to teach in AICTE-approved technical institutions to undergo the training before they take up the job, otherwise they will not be allowed to work,” another senior AICTE official said.

“The faculty members will be educated on ways to engage the students through videos and discussions. They must understand how to solve the problems of the students,” he said.

[“source=forbes]

Nokia 7.1 with HDR-10 display and Android 9 launched in India

HMD has launched the Nokia 7.1 in India. The phone is priced at INR 19,999 ($287) and will be available across all major outlets and Nokia website starting December 7.

Airtel subscribers will get additional data on select plans upon purchasing the phone. HDFC Bank customers will get special cashback offers when purchasing on EMI.

The Nokia 7.1 is Nokia’s latest mid-range smartphone. It has a 5.84-inch FHD+ display with HDR-10 support, a first for a device in this class. The phone runs on Qualcomm Snapdragon 636 processor with 4GB RAM and 64GB expandable storage.

On the back is a dual camera with a 12MP f1.8 primary camera with dual-pixel autofocus and a 5MP depth sensor. The primary camera uses Zeiss optics. On the front is a 8MP f2.0 shooter. The battery on the Nokia 7.1 is a 3060mAh and supports fast charging.

The Nokia 7.1 will be available in two colors, Gloss Midnight Blue and Gloss Steel. You can read our full review

 [“source=gsmarena”]